Industrial clusters

Clusters are a striking feature of economies, making regions uniquely competitive for jobs and private investment. Regional economies are the building blocks of U.

Industrial clusters

What Makes a Cluster?

Clusters encompass an array of linked industries and other entities important to competition. They include, for example, suppliers of specialized inputs such as components, machinery, and services, and providers of specialized infrastructure.

Clusters also often extend downstream to channels and customers and laterally to manufacturers of complementary products and to companies in industries related by skills, technologies, or common inputs.

Finally, many clusters include governmental and other institutions--such as universities, standards-setting agencies, think tanks, vocational training providers, and trade associations. Increasingly, the competitiveness of metropolitan regions relies on the development of industrial clusters, or geographic concentrations of businesses and institutions in related economic sectors.

The physical proximity of the players encourages interaction and promotes the exchange of ideas and expertise. A look at successful economies also highlights the importance of developing innovative industrial clusters characterized by a high level of interaction among firms, thus enabling them, as a group, to learn about changing economic conditions, adapt to them and benefit from them.

The interactive nature of clusters stimulates innovation and economic learning. Clusters stimulate regional competitiveness in three ways:Manufacturing production in both developed and developing economies tends to be highly geographically concentrated in cities and industrial clusters.

The story of Taiwan Industrial Clusters (I) features seven major industrial clusters: machine tools, plumbing hardware, hosiery, towels, orchids, eyeglasses and fasteners. This sequel is divided into another nine pivotal domestic industrial clusters: glass, yachts, automobile parts and accessories, musical instruments, ceramics, food, food 4/5(1).

Learning to Compete Industrial clusters: Who benefits? Introduction manufacturing production in both developed and developing economies tends to be highly geographically concentrated in cities.

Industrial clusters

The U.S. Cluster Mapping site provides over 50 million open data records on industry clusters and regional business environments in the U.S.

to promote economic growth and national competitiveness. Definition of Industrial Cluster "Clusters are geographic concentrations of interconnected companies and institutions in a particular field.

Clusters encompass an array of linked industries and other entities important to competition.

Industrial clusters

While clusters of industries that are present in a region do not necessarily need public sector strategies in order to exist—the industries cluster regardless—the right policies and strategies can help the businesses within a cluster .

Industrial Clusters - McAllen EDC